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Thread: Roos on 702 talking about coaching Swans

  1. #13
    Senior Player
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    Quote Originally Posted by goswannies View Post
    LoL

    I ask because I've got most of my copies of Swans biographies/autobiographies signed by either the author or the subject (even Capper's his inspirational message "kick arse")
    C'mon Chels!

  2. #14
    Senior Player dejavoodoo44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goswannies View Post
    LoL

    I ask because I've got most of my copies of Swans biographies/autobiographies signed by either the author or the subject (even Capper's his inspirational message "kick arse")
    Should have asked for a lock of his famous hair.

  3. #15
    pr. dim-melb; m not f
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    Nearly finished the book. It's a great read, especially on the detailed preparation Roosy underwent. His time in the US after retiring as a player was hugely influential on his approach to coaching and I think gave him a great advantage when the powers that be heard his job application presentation. And a thoroughly enjoyable ride on the rollercoaster that led to the premiership.

    I found his discussion of specific players genuinely enlightening, especially Ben Mathews, who comes out of it very well.
    He reminds him of the guys, close-set, slow, and never rattled, who were play-makers on the team. (John Updike, seeing Josh Kennedy in a crystal ball)

  4. #16
    I am still reading the book.
    I bought it on Kindle (through Amazon), so probably a cheaper way than the hard copy.

  5. #17
    pr. dim-melb; m not f
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    Finished this morning. I think it is one of the most helpful books I've read on the subject of training players, the importance of learning patterns of play, and the reasoning behind the repeated exhortations to play your role. He argues that people outside the club saw us as trying to lock down games instead of moving the ball. There is an element of truth in this, and at times that's what was needed, but in fact the training emphasised "either get the ball or make the tackle". In either case the sequel was to move the ball. If we didn't have the ball they were trained to lock onto their man. I had to chuckle at that point thinking of all the times I yelled at the players (or the screen) "For God's sake man up!"

    The chapters on his Melbourne years are especially illuminating, and while he refrains from bagging his predecessors (his US experience made a huge difference to his approach) it is quite clear that the early promotion of new draftees is a disastrous policy. You might think that's what we did, and are doing, with Heeney and Mills, but the difference is that they came from a Swans background before they were drafted and were much better prepared than, for instance, the unfortunate Jack Watts.

    The most serious question that to my mind remains unanswered is: Why are there games where the whole team (except our fine captain) seems to forget what they have learned at training? I think one answer is that there times when it seems we don't take our opposition seriously enough. I'd be interested to hear other responses to this perpetual problem.
    He reminds him of the guys, close-set, slow, and never rattled, who were play-makers on the team. (John Updike, seeing Josh Kennedy in a crystal ball)

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