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Thread: Injury management

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by bloodspirit View Post
    I don't remember now exactly where I read it, Meg, but what Mel_C has written sounds exactly as I recall it (except that I didn't remember it being Pridham who said it). It was fairly recent (i.e. a few weeks ago).

    I also didn't realise Tom Cross had been with us so long. Here's his comments on the difference between AFL and NRL:

    In AFL there’s approximately two hours of exposure time in the game and some players are on the field for most of that. In turn, they’re at risk of soft tissue and bony injuries, so there are more overuse injuries in AFL than NRL. In NRL, there are many more collision injuries given the nature of the front-on tackling and the number of collisions in the game. They come from this article: Coffee with Cynthia: Dr Tom Cross - sydneyswans.com.au.
    Although most injuries have accepted protocols for diagnosis and treatment, all injuries are unique to some extent. This is where a health practitioners experience comes to the fore.

    For example, if a physio has treated many ACLs, specifically in AFL players, then they will be more able to fine tune a rehab program specific to that particular player's injury and requirements. If they have only ever looked after NRL knees, then their ability to be intuitive about an AFL knee, especially if it starts to deviate from the usual, is not as good as someone who has the experience.

    In medicine and healthcare in general, we try to practice in a robust, evidence based way. However, there is still no substitute for specific experience in a particular patients, particular problem.

  2. #62
    Go Swannies! Site Admin Meg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph Dawg View Post

    For example, if a physio has treated many ACLs, specifically in AFL players, then they will be more able to fine tune a rehab program specific to that particular player's injury and requirements. If they have only ever looked after NRL knees, then their ability to be intuitive about an AFL knee, especially if it starts to deviate from the usual, is not as good as someone who has the experience.
    Yes that makes sense at the beginning of a medico move from rugby to AFL. But over time, s/he will gain the required experience.

    That’s why I was a bit surprised when the comment about medical expertise disadvantage was attributed to the Swans as Dr Tom Cross now has many years experience with the Swans (off and on as an assistant from 1998, now as head doctor since 2016).

    However the comment actually came from GWS. And looking at their medical staff listing, there are a lot of quite recent appointments coming from rugby backgrounds. Specifically their Chief Medical Officer only joined the Giants at the beginning of this season from Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs in the NRL. So he is still in his on-the-job learning phase as far as AFL injuries are concerned.

    Possibly GWS looked interstate for a medical doctor with AFL experience before they made this appointment but found anyone suitable wanted additional remuneration to move to Sydney. Hence Shepherd’s comment.

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